Two lynx released in the wild

A bobcat and a lynx were treated and released into the wild by the Atlantic Institute of Wildlife in Cookville, New Brunswick.

The bobcat was found last fall when it was a few weeks old.

“We had to keep him for a while to grow up and make sure he was going to regain his wild instincts,” says Pam Novak, director of the Atlantic Institute of Wildlife.

Nearly a year after her captivity, the bobcat finally began to show signs of aggression towards humans, which is a good sign, adds the director.

It is important to wait at least 24 to 48 hours if a wild animal seems to be separated from its mother, explains Novak, because it may have been only absent to fetch food.

People should not interact with these animals, she adds, unless the animal has a physical injury and needs immediate help.

A short stay

As for the other animal that was released, a lynx, the stay was much shorter.

The adult female, who had been found in a derelict Rogersville, only stayed for a month at the Institute.

A lynx that had parasites was cured by the Atlantic Institute of Wildlife.   Photo: Atlantic Wildlife Institute
A lynx that had parasites was cured by the Atlantic Institute of Wildlife. Photo: Atlantic Wildlife Institute

Novak says that when the lynx female arrived she was hungry.

“Once she started gaining weight again, she became more energetic and her wild instincts came back,” says Novak.

She was finally taken back to where she was found.

A new resident

Another bobcat, found in the yard of a resident of St. George, New Brunswick, has just been collected by the Atlantic Wildlife Institute.

Barely a month old, the young boarder will spend the winter with Institute staff and will likely be released into the wild by spring or summer.

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About the Author: James Johnson

James Johnson is one of the lead editors for NB Post Gazette. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. James specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.

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